Research

Lake Scugog

Since its beginning, the Scugog Lake Stewards have been involved in scientific studies to further understand the lake.  This has included the plants and animals associated with it, the appearance of invasive species such as Eurasian watermilfoil, Zebra mussels, and recently the pervasive alga, Starry Stonewort.

Partners:

In 2018, the Stewards have partnered with the University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Department of Biology, and with Kawartha Conservation, York University, and the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry in scientific studies of the lake waters and the nutrients they contain. (For so much more see our many videos on YouTube)

We have been studying changes as well in the near-shore waters and in the lake bed itself.

We are mapping developments in the plant and animal life in the lake as it changes from a plant-dominated system to an algal-dominated system.

Fish populations:

Fish population changes in Lake Scugog are of major interest to us and to the economy of the ecosystem. The overall health and beauty of the lake is never far from our thoughts and the scientific studies underway at present have the long-term future of the lake high on their agenda. Over time, climate change will cause many changes in the ecosystem. Lake Scugog is a headwater of the Kawartha lakes system and what we discover in our quest for knowledge in the waters of Lake Scugog will give an early warning of things to come further downstream in the chain of lakes.

This work continues throughout the year with emphases on the summer months and during winter, conducting under-ice studies of the lake bed to increase our understanding of the conditions under which our fish populations and lake plants survive the winter months.

The on-going Lake Scugog research is being sponsored by a major grant from the Ontario Trillium Foundation. This work will continue into 2020 when the results of the research will be published for all to share. With the results, we will have a unique understanding of the lake, the effects of climate change and invasive species with additional insight into the problem of the dwindling number of walleye in the lake and how this might be corrected.